Assassination of Muslim Brotherhood in Misrata

26.01.2013 La rédaction

Gunmen opened fire at Sheikh Mohamed bin Othman, a Muslim Brotherhood and Misrata local council member, near Ras Amar mosque, Misrata, Misrata, libya. Othman died in the attack. No group claimed responsibility for the incident.

Sources

Global Terrorism database

“Muslim Brotherhood member shot dead in libya,” Agence France Presse — English, January 27, 2013.”

“Misratan Councillor murdered outside mosque,” libya TV, January 27, 2013.”

“Misrata council member murdered,” libya Herald, January 26, 2013.”

Libyan Muslim Brotherhood Building Attacked

Assailants threw a grenade at the libyan Muslim Brotherhood center in Al-Marj city, Marj district, Libya. There were no reported casualties; however, the building was damaged in the blast. No group claimed responsibility for the incident.

Sources

Global Terrorism database

“Local libyan Muslim Brotherhood Building Attacked With Hand Grenade,” Al-Tadamun News Agency, October 21, 2012.”

Yousef Al-Qaradhawi: Assad Must be Opposed and Killed

Yousef Al-Qaradhawi, head of the International Union of Muslim Scholars, told Al-Jazeera that clerics across the Muslim world agree that Assad must be fought against and even killed, because he is using his weapons against the peaceful Syrian people. Therefore, he said, the Muslims must wage jihad against him in their hearts, with their tongues (i.e., with words), or with weapons, as the FSA is doing. He added that it is a duty to fight this arrogant and tyrannical regime that is behaving as though it is God, and that the task of fighting it belongs first of all to the Syrians themselves, though the rest of the Muslims must assist them.[1] It should be noted that in August 2011, Al-Qaradhawi signed his name to a fatwa that was published in the Gulf, which called to sever all official ties with the “heretical” Assad regime.[2]

Source Memri

[1] See MEMRI TV clip no. 3370, “Sunni Cleric Sheik Yousuf Al-Qaradhawi: Bashar Al-Assad Deserves to Be Fought and Killed,” March 4, 2012, http://www.memritv.org/clip/en/3370.htm.

[2] See MEMRI Special Dispatch no. 4094, “Fatwa in the Gulf, Signed by Yousuf Al-Qaradhawi: Syrian Regime Is ‘Heretical’; Sever Ties with It,” August 22, 2011, http://www.memri.org/report/en/0/0/0/0/0/0/5589.htm.

The “Ikhwan Ministry” in Koweit

READING, WRITING, AND QUR’ANIC RECITATION: THE ISLAMIST INFLUENCE IN KUWAIT’S EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM, PART II
Date:2005 July 25, 04:59 (Monday)Canonical ID:05KUWAIT3266_a
Original Classification:CONFIDENTIALCurrent Classification:CONFIDENTIAL
Handling Restrictions— Not Assigned —Character Count:15861
Executive Order:— Not Assigned —Locator:TEXT ONLINE
TAGS:ISLAMISTS | KIRF – International Religious Freedom | KISL – Islamic Issues | KU – Kuwait | KWMN – Women”s Issues | PGOV – Political Affairs–Government; Internal Governmental Affairs | PINR – Political Affairs–Intelligence | PREL – Political Affairs–External Political Relations | PTER – Political Affairs–Terrorists and Terrorism | SCUL – Social Affairs–Cultural AffairsConcepts:— Not Assigned —
Enclosure:— Not Assigned —Type:TE
Office Origin:— N/A or Blank —Office Action:— N/A or Blank —Archive Status:— Not Assigned —
From:Kuwait Kuwait CityMarkings:— Not Assigned —
To:— N/A or Blank —

ContentRaw contentMetadataPrintShareShow HeadersB. KUWAIT 1306 C. KUWAIT 656 D. KUWAIT 264 E. 03 KUWAIT 482Classified By: CDA Matthew H. Tueller for reasons 1.4(b) and (d).This is Part II of a two-part message.The “Ikhwan Ministry” ———————21. (SBU) The Education Ministry, the GOK department responsible for the religious education program and textbooks, is perceived by many to be a bastion of conservative Sunni ideology, mainly that of the Sunni Muslim Brotherhood (Ikhwan Al-Muslimeen). Few question the role of the Muslim Brotherhood in the historical development of the educational system in Kuwait. There are disagreements, however, over the effect of the Brotherhood’s influence and whether or not its involvement led to the promotion of intolerance and violence.22. (SBU) Dr. Ali Al-Tarrah, Dean of the College of Social Sciences at Kuwait University, told PolOff that the Muslim Brotherhood controls the Education Ministry and the Kuwait Teacher’s Association. He said that the Education Ministry is known as the “Ikhwan Ministry,” with members of the Muslim Brotherhood are found throughout the organization. Al-Tarrah is prone to exaggerate for effect, however, all other academics with whom PolOff spoke agreed generally with this assessment, although some differed on its meaning and relevance.23. (U) In the 1950s and early 1960s, Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser launched a campaign against members of the Muslim Brotherhood after a 1954 assassination attempt, which caused many members of the organization to seek refuge in other countries. Saudi Arabia was at odds with Egypt’s world view because of President Nasser’s encouragement of revolutionary notions, visions of pan-Arab, secular nationalism, economic socialism, and his growing relationship with the Soviet Union. Because of this animosity between the two nations, many members of the persecuted Muslim Brotherhood fled Egypt to Saudi Arabia, a country that proved tolerant of their beliefs, and also to other welcoming parts of the Gulf, including Kuwait.24. (SBU) Al-Hattab, a former member of the Muslim Brotherhood, said that because the fleeing members opposed Nasser, they were taken in and treated well, quickly assuming posts in religious education. Before long, he explained, all Kuwaiti religious education was guided by the ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood, including the ideas of founder Hassan Al-Bana and Sayyid Qutub, considered by some to be the father of modern Islamic extremism.25. (SBU) Al-Ajmi said the growth of conservative and intolerant Islam in Kuwait’s educational system was symptomatic of bigger societal developments. He explained that the problem was that the GOK, like Saudi Arabia, after the 1979 storming of the Grand Mosque in Mecca, tried to “outmaneuver the extremists by becoming more extreme” by advocating state policies that gave support to conservative and ultra-conservative Muslim groups and ideologies. Al-Ajmi said that this has proven to be an ineffective approach and suggested that regional governments are no longer capable of outmaneuvering the extremists.26. (C) Al-Rubei said that during his tenure as Education Minister in the mid-1990s, the majority of officials in the ministry were members of the Muslim Brotherhood. He said, that although Muslim Brotherhood members were still prevalent, there is a greater mix of ideological beliefs in the ministry including some liberals, and a notable increase in the number of Salafis. He told PolOff that the GOK was in large part responsible for the growth of the Muslim Brotherhood in Kuwait and said that Crown Prince Shaykh Saad Al-Abdullah Al-Salem greatly supported their rise and agenda. Politics Constrain GOK Role; Private Schools Threatened27. (SBU) Within the Ministry of Education there is a board that has great authority over the content of the curriculum. Al-Hattab, who oversaw the board while in charge of religious education at the Education Ministry, said the board, composed mostly of members of the Muslim Brotherhood, opposed many of his efforts to reform the system. He said board members often obtained their positions based not on their expertise, but because of their seniority in the Ministry, gained, he said, through connections to the Muslim Brotherhood.28. (C) After liberation during the early-to-mid 1990s, Al-Hattab told PolOff that he began making efforts to reform the religious curriculum and that even the media began to support his efforts to change the system. He met with stiff opposition, however, from the Higher Consultative Committee for the Finalization of the Application of the Provision of the Islamic Shari’a. This body, part of the Amiri Diwan, asked the Education Minister to add more courses and Qur’anic verses to the Islamic education program. The Committee told the Education Minister that the Amir supported this program proposal although, according to Al-Hattab, the Amir never endorsed the decision. (Note: The Committee, which reports directly to the Amir, was created to review Kuwait’s laws to ensure compliance with Shari’a. Its findings are provided to the Amir and include suggestions on how to change legislation to bring it into compliance with Islamic law. End Note.) The Education Minister eventually succumbed to the pressure from the Amiri Committee, and Al-Hattab’s efforts to reform the system ended. Al-Hattab, told PolOff that after his reform effort failed, he was removed from his position.29. (SBU) The curriculum debate now threatens to extend to private schools, traditionally excluded from religious education requirements. There is a move underway from Islamists to require private schools to teach mandatory Islamic studies and Qur’an courses. Private schools currently do not abide by a GOK requirement to teach Islamic religious studies to students because of an official decision made in the 1990s by then-Education Minister Al-Rubei that Islamic education should be “taught in public schools.” Because the ministerial decision did not mention private schools, they were assumed to be exempt from the requirement. Some private schools, however, provide Islamic religious education lessons as an optional course. Salafi professor Al-Shatti believes that religious courses should be mandated in private schools because most of the students are Muslims and because the teaching of the Qur’an is “essential.”30. (SBU) Al-Tarrah told PolOff that the Shari’a College is now putting pressure on private schools to allow Shari’a graduates to teach religious studies courses to private school students. The graduates from the college, he explained, are now trying to be placed into private schools to teach Islamic Studies despite the fact that, according to Al-Tarrah, the private schools are not interested in having ultra-conservative Sunnis teach their students their interpretation of Islam. Shari’a Studies —————31. (SBU) Many religious education teachers are graduates of the conservative Sunni-Islam based Shari’a College. The Shari’a College was initially only a department in the Faculty of Law at Kuwait University, but has since expanded in importance and influence. Because of its reputation for producing ultra-conservative religious “scholars,” public discussion revived after the January shoot-outs about merging the college into the Faculty of Law as a department. To date, the College remains an independent academic institution.32. (SBU) The Faculty of the Shari’a College is composed of approximately 70 professors who teach Islamic studies at Kuwait University and there are approximately 1,250 enrolled students with 200-250 graduating from the program every year. The College was created in 1981 and was modeled, according to Shari’a professor Al-Shatti, after the Islamic University of Medina, Saudi Arabia. Al-Shatti said the Amir sought the help of the Egyptian Faculty of Shari’a at Al-Azhar when developing the idea for a Kuwaiti Shari’a College. He said Kuwaiti Islamist Ajeel Al-Nashmi developed the curriculum for Kuwait. Al-Nashmi is former dean of the Faculty of Shari’a, former member of the Fatwa Department at the Awqaf Ministry, and holds vehemently anti-U.S. views.33. (U) The College, divided into the departments of “Fundamentals of Religion” and “Fundamentals of Jurisprudence,” began offering an MA program in 2000, and intends to offer a Ph.D. in Islamic Law in 2006. All courses focus on the Islamic elements of each discipline to include topics such as sociology, psychology, and the media. He estimated that 86 percent of the students attending the College were Kuwaiti and the remaining 14 percent were foreign students representing 60 nations, mostly, however, from the GCC. He said there are no Americans studying at the Shari’a College.34. (C) Al-Tarrah remarked that the curriculum at the Shari’a College was very easy, further commenting that if it were more difficult, many of the students would leave the school. He said that approximately 20 percent of the student body is from the Army and that over 90 percent are Bedouins from the rural tribes, an inherently conservative sector of society. He said there was a pending proposal to add requirements for foreign language proficiency and liberal arts courses. Al-Tarrah supported this proposal, saying a more challenging, well-rounded curricula would force many of the more provincial and less serious students to drop out. Al-Ajmi expressed greater concerns about the institution, describing the College as a “haven of extremists.” He mentioned that one of the courses was entitled “The Groups that Went Astray.” He said this course, along with many others like it, reveals the biased nature and ideology inherent in the teaching at the College. The GOK Acknowledges Some Need To Change —–35. (U) The Education Ministry recently approved a new educational plan for primary school students, which will begin with the 2005 fall term. Some changes in the curricula are expected: a new national studies program to promote national loyalty, a life sciences course to teach students about Kuwaiti traditions and lifestyles, and more computer studies. The new school year will be divided into four quarters with exams coming at the end of the second and fourth quarters, and there is discussion of reducing the amount of homework for primary school children. Students will now have 35 classes per week, instead of 32, and all students will attend school from 7:30 AM – 13:20 PM, a slightly longer day for most.36. (U) Dr. Mohammed Al-Musaleem, Assistant Undersecretary for Research and Curriculum at the Ministry of Education, speaking in July on the revised curricula, said publicly that inculcating patriotism and an awareness of national heritage was essential. The new curricula for all students, projected to go into effect in the 2006-2007 school year, is expected to reduce the number of books students use and improve the quality of their content. He also said that computers will be used increasingly as a teaching tool. Educational consultant Dr. Ibrahim Karam, speaking about the books to be used under the new program, said that most are revised, have a new look, and are “appropriate.”37. (U) The GOK has been studying many proposals on how best to address the problems in the curriculum, of which the religious education debate is the most contentious part. Prime Minister Shaykh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah appointed chairmen, all leading academics at Kuwait University, to six committees to examine educational reform options. Al-Tarrah oversees the committee seeking to propose methods to integrate elements of modernity into the societal identity. The other committee chairmen are Dr. Abdul Reda Aseeri, liberal professor and Chairman of the Political Science Department; Dr. Saleh Jassem, Faculty of Education; Islamist Dr. Abdullah Al-Shaykh, professor and Dean of the Faculty of Higher Studies; Dr. Nabil Al-Loghani, Faculty of Administrative Sciences; and Dr. As’ad Ismail, professor and Dean of Admissions and Registration. 38. (SBU) Al-Tarrah told PolOff that his committee recommended that educational reform address the whole system and not just the religious aspects. He said the system itself was flawed and to be successful at revising the religious elements, the entire curricula must be changed. His committee proposed several reforms including courses on life skills (how to act in society), international civilization (including human rights issues), and national education (emphasizing a Kuwaiti national identity.) His proposal also included more music and computer classes, oversight of teachers, and revised approaches to disciplining teachers. He recommended that any change be approved by the Cabinet to ensure that future Education Ministers are not singularly able to overturn the changes. Al-Tarrah’s committee traveled to Malaysia and Singapore to study how other countries have integrated aspects of Islam into the educational system. GOK Willingness to Challenge Islamists on Reform Suspect39. (C) Comment: Some critics have focused on the teaching of violent interpretations of jihad to express their discontent with Kuwait’s religious education system. While this is a topic of great concern, many opponents of the system are just as concerned about the volume of conservative social teachings that are spread through the schools. The reforms suggested by the GOK do not appear to adequately address either.40. (C) The GOK has acknowledged a plan to reform or replace textbooks, to de-emphasize violence, and to increase teachings on tolerance, however, it has not engaged in any serious public discussion on these matters. It is trying to reform the educational system with recommendations from academics and consultants without actually debating openly the merits of the changes or the ills of the past. In all public pronouncements there are few specifics given as to what exactly has been changed outside of the addition of a few new courses and a “new look” to some of the books. The candid public discussions about teaching jihad and the influence of religious conservatives following the January shoot-outs have since waned and been replaced by GOK statements ensuring that revised books and lessons will be “appropriate to the context.”41. (C) Some GOK officials are aware that something needs to change; however, the solution appears to be the one with the smallest ripple effect and the least political resistance. It is doubtful now whether the GOK is willing to confront the Islamists directly on the issue of religious influence in society, and whether, if they are, such a confrontation will take place over the curriculum, rather than over other social or political issues. End Comment.

Olivier Roy Visits Al-Qaradawi Translators

On 13 May 2005, CNRS researcher, Olivier Roy, will address the International Institute of Islamic Thought in connection with his latest book: “Secularism Confronts Islam” in which he defends Tariq Ramadan and a gives a finger-wagging lesson in morality to committed journalists (i.e. all those who criticize Islamists).

His own views actually reflect limited scientific neutrality as he endorses, through his presence, a fundamentalist institute aiming to provide scientific guarantees for political and radical Islam, as developed by the Muslim Brotherhood.

The International Institute of Islamic Thought has been looking for a few months to establish different types of collaboration with non-Islamic institutions. Nevertheless, a simple look at the Institute’s productions suffices to be be appalled by its radicalism. Its publications and translations include “The Sunna of the Prophet” by Yusuf Al-Qaradawi, a man who approves excision and wife beating and justifies suicide attacks against the “Sons of Sion “.

After some of the Institute’s officials have been sidelined for helping to finance terrorist organizations, the US parent company, International Institute of Islamic Thought (IIIT) now enjoys the mercy of the US administration, which seriously believes that Muslim Brotherhood can be an alternative in Muslim countries. A communication campaign designed to glamorize the movement is also underway.

This campaign includes outreach by all IIIT branches, including the French one which has recently invited several personalities to visit the IIIT-USA in April 2005, including Bariza Khiari, Paris Senator, Nadia Bourdi, Deputy-Mayor of Saint Etienne and Franck Fregosi, a Strasbourg researcher.

This post is also available in Français .

We are normalizing what is fighted elsewhere

By granting the UOIF a prominent place in the French Council of the Muslim Faith (CFCM), the Interior took a big risk. We opted for a very minority fringe protest seeking to politicize Islam at the expense of the vast majority of Muslims who wish to live their faith appeased so as part of the Republic. Thus, an official body such as the CFCM serves as home to Islamists who want to influence the French laws and continually criticize Muslim countries where they are hunted. It’s amazing: the Muslim Brotherhood does not have an official showcase in Egypt or Morocco, but in France, though! It trivializes what is  fighted elsewhere. What are the objectives of Youssef al-Qaradhawi, the thinker of the Union of Islamic Organizations in Europe? He wants to restore the caliphate in Muslim countries, and block any effort to adapt for Muslims living in Europe! These people want to import a rigorous and closed Islam. This is precisely why the patrons of the Gulf countries fund. Today, the CFCM is only an issue of power for discussing everything except Muslim spirituality. The next election for the renewal of the CFCM will not change that. It would be more reasonable to rely on the network of large mosques as well as qualified persons in matters of worship that are truly loving principles of our Republic and our common experience. “Soheib Bencheikh,mufti de Marseillehttp://www.lexpress.fr/actualite/societe/religion/la-face-cachee-de-l-uoif_486103.html#3pX74zTZouTvU0lf.99

This post is also available in Français .

Employment by the European Commission of the radical Islamic thinker Tariq Ramadan in the capacity of a ‘consultant’

(2004/C 84 E/0698)

WRITTEN QUESTION P-0550/04

by Mario Borghezio (Nl) to the Commission

(19 February 2004)

Subject:   Employment by the European Commission of the radical Islamic thinker Tariq Ramadan in the capacity of a ‘consultant’

Given that:

according to newspaper reports, the Islamic thinker Tariq Ramadan is acting as a consultant to the European Commission;
Tariq Ramadan is a leading proponent of radical Islam, to which he also has strong family ties, being the grandson of Hassan al-Banna, the founder of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood, a founding organisation of international Islamic fundamentalism;
in 1995 Ramadan was declared ‘persona non grata’ by the French Republic, on the recommendation of the Ministry of the Interior in Paris, and seems, furthermore, to have had links in subsequent years with Al Qaeda elements operating in Europe;
1.On what grounds has Tariq Ramadan been taken on as a consultant by the European Commission, with what type of contract of what duration, and how much is his monthly fee?
2.Does the European Commission not intend to terminate this contract in the interests of European tax-payers ceasing to pay large sums of money for the services of a dangerous proponent of radical anti-European and anti-Western Islam?

Answer given by Mr Prodi on behalf of the Commission

(16 March 2004)

The Commission would point out to the Honourable Member that his questions have already been answered (see Written Questions E-2494/02 from Mr Camre (1) and P-2600/03 from Mr Turco (2)).

1.However, the Commission wishes to take the opportunity provided by the Honourable Member to reiterate that Professor Ramadan is not, and never has been, employed by the Commission as a consultant. Like all the other members of the group of wise men on dialogue between peoples and cultures in the Euro-Mediterranean area, he received funds to cover his travel and subsistence expenses for the group meetings in which he took part.The amounts paid by the Commission were small and commensurate with the amounts normally refunded to participants in meetings of the group of wise men organised by the Commission.
2.There can therefore be no question of the Commission having to terminate a contract. There has never been any reason for any such contract to exist, either with Professor Ramadan or with the other members of the group.The Commission would point out to the Honourable Member that the membership of this group of wise men was designed to reflect the diversity of perspectives of inter-cultural dialogue in the EU and the Mediterranean basin. The Commission plans to continue working along these lines because it believes that its ability to make a clear diagnosis as a prelude to action which is in the common interest of the EU as a whole and of its Member States is largely contingent on a wide range of viewpoints and analyses being heard.The Commission would also stress that the work of the group of wise men took place in full accordance with the principles on which the European Union is based and with the requirements which dialogue imposes. Each member of the group, without exception or restriction, complied with this common rule by approving and signing a report specifically based on the principles of ‘respect for the Other’, ‘equality at all levels’, ‘freedom of conscience, absolute and without restriction of any kind’, ‘solidarity’ and ‘mutual knowledge’.

(1)  OJ C 155 E, 3.7.2003.

(2)  OJ C 70 E, 20.3.2004, p. 117.

A speech by The Prince of Wales during his visit to The Islamic Foundation

In this surprising speech, Prince Charles highlights the contribution of the Islamic Foundation, publisher of Mawdudi and Qutb. Both theorician of excommunication (Takfir) and not defensive jihad

Ladies and gentlemen, I am very pleased to be here, which is all Mr Chowdhury Mueen-Uddin’s fault! He kept saying to me that I must come and see the Foundation at Markfield and here I am at last.

A little over a year ago, Mr Chowdhury Mueen-Uddin welcomed Prince Muhammad Al-Faisal and me to East London Mosque with the remark that royal princes are like London buses: you wait for ages for one to come along, then two turn up at once. All I can say is that this particular one has been very much looking forward to this visit here today.

The Islamic Foundation is pioneering institution in many ways and is well known for its scholarly work, its publications and its research. The Foundation has also, for many years, been at the forefront of dialogue between the Muslims of Britain and their non-Muslim fellow citizens, and has sought to make the tenets of the faith of Islam accessible to everyone through active participation in inter-faith dialogue and education.

For example, cultural awareness courses held in this very hall as part of the education and training unit, further the education of local authority employees, social workers, police officers, and others whose work brings them into daily contact with our Muslim fellow-citizens.

So the Foundation plays a very practical role. But this is, above all, a scholarly institution, and the legacy of Muslim scholarship is vast, ranging from mathematics to astrology, science, medicine, geography and the arts.

For example, anyone who doubts the contribution of Islam and Muslims to the European Renaissance should, as an exercise, try to do some simple arithmetic using Roman numerals. Thank goodness for Arabic numerals and the concept of Zero introduced into European thought by Muslim mathematicians!

Generations of school children have Muhammad Al-Khwarizmi to thank for introducing Europe to the joys of Algebra, which I remember only too well, when his 9th century book on the subject was translated into Latin in 1145.

It might even be questioned whether Columbus would ever have found his New World without the experience and skills of his Muslim navigators, some of whom, it is claimed, had actually crossed the Atlantic on previous occasions.

In more recent times, as Muslims began to make this island their home, we saw the establishment in the early nineteenth century of “Mahomed’s Baths and Shampooing Establishment” in once-fashionable Brighton. Mr Mahomed’s son Frederick Akbar Mahomed went on to qualify as a doctor of medicine and was instrumental, if you pardon the appalling pun, in developing the sphygmomanometer, the first “Blood pressure measuring instrument”, at Guy’s Hospital in the 1870s.

Liverpool solicitor and noted traveller William Henry Quilliam established the country’s first Muslim school and orphanage in his home city, as well as a mosque and Islamic library. My own family benefitted from Islamic wisdom too – Queen Victoria, my great, great, great grandmother, was taught Hindustani using Persian script by Hafez Abdul Karim, one of several Indian staff in her household.

When Lord Ahmed of Rotherham was elevated to the peerage in the 1990s, it was hailed as a breakthrough for the Muslim community. However, Muslim convert Lord Stanley of Adderley beat him into the upper house by more than a hundred years, as did Lord Headley, who announced his conversion to the faith of Islam in 1913.

The presence of Muslims in academia, public office and the higher echelons of our society is thus not something new, but it is something to be celebrated. And we might also pause, perhaps, to remember the hundreds of Muslims who died in the service of the Crown in two world wars. The Merchant Navy Memorials on Tower Hill in London, for example, provide ample evidence of those brave Muslim men who gave their lives on board British ships.

Given such a heritage, ladies and gentlemen, I am delighted to be here at the official opening of the new Markfield Institute of Higher Education building. The prime focus for the Islamic Foundation is the promotion of first-rate scholarship and learning, embodying the vision of the founder, the current Chairman and our host today, Professor Kurshid Ahmad.

I believe that this whole complex here at Markfield, including the excellent library, has the potential to develop into one of Europe’s leading centres for post-graduate study of Islam and the Muslim world.

Leicester has every reason to be proud to have such an impressive range of facilities in its own back yard. The need for access to information about the study of Islam has arguably never been greater. I am confident, therefore, that the Islamic Foundation and the Markfield Institute of Higher Education will come to represent all that is to be admired about Islamic scholarship in the West and set a fine example for others to follow.

So, chairman, ladies and gentlemen, it is with enormous pleasure that I declare the new building open…

INDICATIONS OF MORE INCIDENTS PLANNED BY MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD AGAINST AUTHORITIES

Diplomatic Telex1. RELIABLE SYRIAN SOURCE IN TOUCH WITH SYRIAN OFFICIALS INVESTIGATING HAMA DISTURBANCES AND WITH MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD SYMPATHIZERS IN DAMASCUS ADVISED EMBOFF MARCH 1 THAT BROTHERHOOD MAY BE PLANNING “NEW INCIDENTS” IN HAMA. HE SAID THAT IDENTITY OF ASSASSINS OF SECURITY CHIEF GHURRA HAD NOT YET BEEN DISCOVERED. HE ALSO CLAIMED THAT INVESTIGATION HAD SO FAR YIELDED NO EVIDENCE OF FOREIGN INVOLVEMENT IN GHURRA MURDER.2. SOURCE CONTINUED THAT GOVERNOR OF HAMA HAD BEEN CALLED IN BY PRES ASAD TO ACCOUNT FOR PROKBLEMS IN HIS DISTRICT. ACCORDING TO SOURCE, GOVERNOR COMPLAINED THAT HAMA HAD RECEIVED LITTLE DEVELOPMENT FUNDING IN COMPARISION WITH NUMEROUS PROJECTS PLANNED FOR ALMOST ALL OTHER PROVINCES. SOURCE ASSERTED THAT CONFIDENTIAL CONFIDENTIAL PAGE 02 DAMASC 01244 041425Z ASAD IMMEDIATELY RELEASED 50 MILLION L.S. FOR HAMA DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS (NOTE: SYRIA PRESS RECENTLY ANNOUNCED PLANS TO CONSTRUCT LARGE NUMBER OF SCHOOLS IN HAMA DISTRICT, TARGETED FOR COMPLETION BY BEGINNING NEXT SCHOOL YEAR).3. SOURCE STATED THAT HIS CONTACTS DESCRIBE “YOUTH OF MUHAMMAD,” WHO CLAIMED RESPONSIBILITY FOR GHURRA SLAYING (REFTEL), AS “MILITARY WING” OF MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD, ACTION ARM OF THE MOVEMENT WHICH IN TIMES PAST WOULD LEAD BROTHERHOOD DEMONSTRATIONS AGAINST COMMUNISTS AND OTHER POLITICAL ELEMENTS IT OPPOSED. HE ADDED THAT BROTHERHOOD WAS CAREFULLY WATCHED IN DAMASCUS, BUT THAT SURVEILLANCE MORE DIFFICULT IN HAMA. AUTHORITIES WERE CONFIDENT OF THEIR ABILITY CONTAIN BROTHERHOOD IN ALL CITIES EXCEPT HAMA, HE CONCLUDED.4. COMMENT: WE CONTINUE TO SEE NO INDICATION IN DAMASCUS THAT SARG BELIEVES IT UNABLE TO DEAL WITH CHALLENGE BY MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD. WE HAVE HEARD NO REPORTS OF ARRESTS OURSIDE HAMA, NOR HAVE WE DETECTED ANY SIGNS INDICATING REGIME’S ANXIETY TOWARD ITS SECURITY. MURPHY CONFIDENTIAL

Date:1976 March 4, 13:59 (Thursday)Canonical ID:1976DAMASC01244_b
From:Syria DamascusMarkings:Margaret P. Grafeld Declassified/Released US Department of State EO Systematic Review 04 MAY 2006
To:Department of State Egypt Cairo | Israel Tel Aviv | Jordan Amman | Lebanon Beirut | Secretary of State 

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